Technical Analysis: EUR/USD

Technical Analysis EUR/USD | March 8, 2017

U.S. Job Market data ahead.

German Unemployment Change better than expected, German Manufacturing slowed down a little bit. German GDP below expectations added to the concerns remain about the outside chance of a victory by far-right French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen.
Greek bailout uncertainty also added to pressure on the euro.

Resistance area @1.061 successfully rejected price down. Now there is room down below 1.05 area.

Investor sentiment remained cautious about USD as nothing is really clear about fiscal, tax and regulatory policy under the Trump administration but now things may change abruptly.

Our special Fibo Retracement is confirming the following S/R levels against the Monthly and Weekly Trendlines obtained by connecting the relevant highs and lows back to 2012:

Weekly Trend: Bearish
1st Resistance: 1.0610
2nd Resistance: 1.0679
1st Support: 1.0463
2nd Support: 1.0399

EUR

Recent Facts:

1st of December, French and German Manufacturing PMI (it measures the activity level of purchasing managers in the manufacturing sector. A reading above 50 indicates expansion in the sector; below indicates contraction)
French Manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, German Manufacturing PMI Slightly Worse than Expected

4th of December, Italy Constitutional Referendum
Prime Minister quits as vote defeat deepens Europe’s turmoil

8th of December, Interest Rate Decision + ECB Press Conference
Interest Rate Unchanged but the European Central Bank wants to extend its asset purchase program for additional nine months

13th of December, Eurozone CPI + German ZEW Economic Sentiment
Eurozone CPI pared the Expectations, German ZEW contrasted

15th of December, German Manufacturing (Preliminary release)
Better than Expected

2nd of January, Eurozone Manufacturing PMI
Better than Expected

3rd of January, German Unemployment + German CPI
Better than Expected

4th of January, Spanish Unemployment + Eurozone Services PMI + Eurozone CPI
Higher than Expected

19th of January, ECB Interest Rates + Press Conference
Rates Unchanged

24th of January, German Manufacturing PMI + Services PMI
Manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, Services PMI Worse than Expected

31st of January, German Unemployment Change
Better than Expected

31st of January, Eurozone’s CPI and GDP preliminary release
Better than Expected

1st of February, Eurozone Manufacturing PMI
As Expected

9th of February, German Trade Balance
Worse than Expected

10th of February, French Industrial Production + French Non-Farm Payrolls
French Industrial Production Worse than Expected, French Non-Farm Payrolls Better than Expected

14th of February: German GDP (Preliminary release) + German ZEW Economic Sentiment + Eurozone GDP (Preliminary release)
German GDP Worse than Expected, German ZEW Worse than Expected, Eurozone GDP Worse than Expected

15th of February, Eurozone Trade Balance
Better than Expected

21st of February, German Manufacturing PMI
Better than Expected

23rd of February, German GDP
Worse than Expected

1st of March, German Manufacturing + German Unemployment Change
German Manufacturing Worse than Expected, German Unemployment Change Better than Expected

2nd of March, Eurozone Inflation data
In line with Expectations

3rd of March, German Services PMI + Eurozone Retail Sales
Worse than Expected

7th of March, Germany Factory Orders
Worse than Expected

Eyes on today release: German Industrial Production

USD

Recent Facts:

2nd of December: Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Better than Expected

14th of December, Fed Interest rate decision + FOMC Meeting
USD Interest Rate hike happened as expected.

15th of December, Core CPI + Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index
Core CPI Slightly Worse than Expected, Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index Better than Expected

22nd of December, Core Durable Goods Orders + GDP
Better than Expected

28th of December, Pending Home Sales
Worse than Expected

4th of January, FOMC Meeting Minutes
The forecast of as many as three rate hikes in 2017 is highly variable on President-elect Donald Trump getting an aggressive tax cut and spending plan through Congress

6th of January, Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Worse than Expected (over the last 6 months, 4 were below the expectations)

13th of January, Producer Price Index + Retail Sales
Producer Price Index Higher than Expected, Retail Sales slightly Worse than Expected

24th of January, Manufacturing PMI + Existing Home Sales
Manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, Existing Home Sales Worse than Expected

27th of January, GDP + Durable Good Orders
GDP Significantly Worse than Expected, Durable Good Orders as Expected

1st of February, ADP Nonfarm Unemployment Change + U.S. Institute for Supply Management Manufacturing
Better than Expected (ISM Manufacturing at its highest level since November 2014)

3rd of February, Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Nonfarm Payrolls better than Expected, Unemployment Rate Worse than Expected

14th of February, Producer Price Index (PPI)
Better than Expected

15th of February, Core CPI (Consumer Price Index) + Retail Sales
Better than Expected

16th of February, Building Permits + Initial Jobless Claims + Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index
Better than Expected

21st of February, Manufacturing PMI + Services PMI
Worse than Expected

27th of February, Core Durable Good Orders + Pending Home Sales
Worse than Expected

28th of February, GDP (Preliminary release)
Worse than Expected

3rd of March, ISM Non-manufacturing PMI + Fed Chair Yellen Speech
ISM Non-manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, Yellen noted that a rate increase at next meeting “would likely be appropriate” insisting on the condition that data on employment and inflation have to move in line with expectations.

Eyes on today release: ADP Nonfarm Employment Change

 

Technical Analysis: GBP/USD

Technical Analysis GBP/USD March 9, 2017 | sgtmarkets.com

U.S. Job Market data ahead.

UK Services PMI below expectations. Also UK Manufacturing PMI and GDP below the expectations. Moreover, during last meeting BoE said that monetary policy could move in either direction.

Test of 1.23 area, strong support, failed. As we wrote in the previous commentaries, a failure of that level would consequently lead down to 1.217 area as next target. Now eyes on 1.197 area.

Our special Fibo Retracement is confirming the following S/R levels against the Monthly and Weekly Trendlines obtained by connecting the relevant highs and lows back to 2001:

Weekly Trend: Bearish
1st Resistance: 1.2295
2nd Resistance: 1.2410
1st Support: 1.2169
2nd Support: 1.1968

GBP

Recent Facts:

4th of August, Bank of England Interest Rates decision (expected a cut)
Bank of England lowers Interest Rates as Expected (record low of 0.25%) and increases purchase program

3rd of November, Services PMI + BoE Monetary Policy votes + Interest Rates Decision
Services PMI Better than Expected, Interest Rates Unchanged and no clues about future change

8th of November, ELECTION OF THE 45th PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
Donald Trump elected President

9th of November, Trade Balance
Worse than Expected

15th of November, CPI
Worse than Expected

16th of November, Job Market
Claimant Count Change (which measures the change in the number of unemployed people in the UK during the reported month) Worse than Expected

17th of November, Retail Sales
Better than Expected

1st of December, Manufacturing PMI (it measures the activity level of purchasing managers in the manufacturing sector)
Worse than Expected

7th of December, Manufacturing Production
Worse than Expected

9th of December, Consumer Inflation Expectations + Trade Balance (EU and non-EU)
Consumer Inflation Expectations Higher then Expected, Trade Balance Better than Expected

13th of December, CPI (UK Price Inflation)
Higher than Expected

14th of December, Job Market
Better than Expected

3rd of January, Manufacturing PMI
Better than Expected (setting a new high since August 2014)

4th of January, Construction PMI
Better than Expected

11th of January, Manufacturing Production
Better than Expected

17th of January, UK Prime Minister May speaks
May confirmed that the UK will leave Europe’s single market, but will seek a deal that gives the greatest possible access, Both the divorce and the new trading environment with the EU can be agreed within the 2 year window set under Article 50.

18th of January, Job Market
Better than Expected

20th of January, Retail Sales
Worse than Expected

26th of January, GDP (Preliminary release)
Better than Expected

1st of February, UK Manufacturing PMI
As Expected

2nd of February, Construction PMI
Worse than Expected

3rd of February, Services PMI
Worse than Expected

10th of February, Manufacturing Production
Better than Expected

14th of February, Consumer Price Index (CPI)
Worse than Expected

15th of February, Job Market
Better than Expected

17th of February, Retail Sales
Worse than Expected

1st of March, Manufacturing PMI
Worse than Expected

2nd of March, Construction PMI
Better than Expected

3rd of March, Services PMI
Worse than Expected

USD

Recent Facts:

2nd of December: Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Better than Expected

14th of December, Fed Interest rate decision + FOMC Meeting
USD Interest Rate hike happened as expected.

15th of December, Core CPI + Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index
Core CPI Slightly Worse than Expected, Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index Better than Expected

22nd of December, Core Durable Goods Orders + GDP
Better than Expected

28th of December, Pending Home Sales
Worse than Expected

4th of January, FOMC Meeting Minutes
The forecast of as many as three rate hikes in 2017 is highly variable on President-elect Donald Trump getting an aggressive tax cut and spending plan through Congress

6th of January, Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Worse than Expected (over the last 6 months, 4 were below the expectations)

13th of January, Producer Price Index + Retail Sales
Producer Price Index Higher than Expected, Retail Sales slightly Worse than Expected

24th of January, Manufacturing PMI + Existing Home Sales
Manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, Existing Home Sales Worse than Expected

27th of January, GDP + Durable Good Orders
GDP Significantly Worse than Expected, Durable Good Orders as Expected

1st of February, ADP Nonfarm Unemployment Change + U.S. Institute for Supply Management Manufacturing
Better than Expected (ISM Manufacturing at its highest level since November 2014)

3rd of February, Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Nonfarm Payrolls better than Expected, Unemployment Rate Worse than Expected

14th of February, Producer Price Index (PPI)
Better than Expected

15th of February, Core CPI (Consumer Price Index) + Retail Sales
Better than Expected

16th of February, Building Permits + Initial Jobless Claims + Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index
Better than Expected

21st of February, Manufacturing PMI + Services PMI
Worse than Expected

27th of February, Core Durable Good Orders + Pending Home Sales
Worse than Expected

28th of February, GDP (Preliminary release)
Worse than Expected

3rd of March, ISM Non-manufacturing PMI + Fed Chair Yellen Speech
ISM Non-manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, Yellen noted that a rate increase at next meeting “would likely be appropriate” insisting on the condition that data on employment and inflation have to move in line with expectations.

Eyes on today release: ADP Nonfarm Employment Change

 

Technical Analysis: AUD/USD

Technical Analysis GBP/USD; March 8, 2017 | sgtmarkets.com

U.S. Job Market data ahead.

RBA held Interest Rates unchanged at 1.50% as expected.

Significantly worse than expected trade balance was a sharp reminder of the damage that a strong currency can do to an export dependent economy. Last print of Australia GDP was better than expected and China’s Manufacturing PMI beats expectations though.

In Australia, private sector credit gained 0.2%, below the 0.5% hike expected, while the current account for the fourth quarter came in at a deficit wider than expected. Also in New Zealand the trade balance for January came in at a deficit wider than the gap expected.

There are some speculation that the economy may need more monetary help going forward. The Reserve Bank of Australia recently affirmed the scope for more rate cuts is slim to none from the current record low of 1.5%.

Next support under test is 0.7440.

Our special Fibo Retracements are confirming the following S/R levels against the Monthly and Weekly Trendlines obtained by connecting the relevant highs and lows back to 2012:

Weekly Trend: Bearish
1st Resistance: 0.7735
2nd Resistance: 0.7828
1st Support: 0.7525
2nd Support: 0.7440

AUD

Recent Facts:

2nd of August, Interest Rates decision cut to from 1.75% to 1.50% as Expected

4th of August, Retail Sales (Jun)
Worse than Expected

11th of August, Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s rate statement
Interest rates cut (to 2%) as Expected

18th of August, Employment Change
Better than Expected. Highest since the beginning of this year

15th of September, Employment Change
Worse than Expected

18th of October, Reserve Bank of Australia Meeting Minutes
RBA’s Governor Philip Lowe said that Inflation Expectations declined, but not that much and that current level of AUD and rates is suitable for economy
In the meantime New Zealand Consumer Price Index came in at 0.2%, above expectations (0%) in 3Q

20th of October, Job Market Data
Worse than Expected

26th of October, Inflation Data (CPI)
Higher than Expected

1st of November, RBA Interest Rates Statement
RBA’s Governor Lowe signals tolerance for weak inflation and bets seem off for future rate cuts

3rd of November, RBA Monetary Policy Statement + Retail Sales
RBA said it is focused on the medium-term inflation target
Retail Sales better than Expected

8th of November, ELECTION OF THE 45th PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
Donald Trump elected President

9th of November, Reserve Bank of New Zealand Interest Rate Decision + Monetary Policy Statement
Interest Rates cut to 1.75% from 2.00% as Expected

17th of November, Employment Change
Slightly Worse than Expected

23rd of November, Australia Construction Work Done
Worse than Expected (for the 5th Quarter in a row)

30th of November, Building Approvals + Australia Private Sector Credit
Building Approvals Worse than Expected, Private Sector Credit Better than Expected

2nd of December, Retail Sales
Better than Expected (for the 3rd Month in a row)

6th of December, Interest Rate Decision + RBA Statement
The Reserve Bank of Australia held its benchmark cash rate at a record low 1.50% As Expected, while noting a stronger Aussie could complicate efforts to rebalance the economy.

7th of December, Gross Domestic Product (GDP)
Worse than Expected

15th of December, Employment Change
Better than Expected

19th of December, Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook
Scott Morrison announced lower than an original prediction of A$37.1 billion, investors see it as promising to stave off a downgrade of its AAA (triple A) rating from S&P Global

9th of January, Retail Sales
Worse than Expected

19th of January, Employment Change
Better than Expected

25th of January, CPI (Consumer Price Index measures the change in the price of goods and services from the perspective of the consumer)
Lower than Expected

1st of February, AIG Manufacturing Index
Worse than Expected

2nd of February, Building Approvals + Trade Balance
Better than Expected

7th of February, RBA Interest Rates Decision + RBA Rate Statement
RBA held steady as expected at a record low 1.50%, while noting better economic conditions with China

8th of February, New Zealand Interest Rate Decision + RBNZ Monetary Policy Statement
Interest Rates Unchanged and RBNZ’s agenda contains no changes for 2017

16th of February, Employment Change
Better than Expected

28th of February, New Home Sales, Current Account, Private Sector Credit

1st of March, Australia GDP
Better than Expected

USD

Recent Facts:

2nd of December: Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Better than Expected

14th of December, Fed Interest rate decision + FOMC Meeting
USD Interest Rate hike happened as expected.

15th of December, Core CPI + Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index
Core CPI Slightly Worse than Expected, Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index Better than Expected

22nd of December, Core Durable Goods Orders + GDP
Better than Expected

28th of December, Pending Home Sales
Worse than Expected

4th of January, FOMC Meeting Minutes
The forecast of as many as three rate hikes in 2017 is highly variable on President-elect Donald Trump getting an aggressive tax cut and spending plan through Congress

6th of January, Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Worse than Expected (over the last 6 months, 4 were below the expectations)

13th of January, Producer Price Index + Retail Sales
Producer Price Index Higher than Expected, Retail Sales slightly Worse than Expected

24th of January, Manufacturing PMI + Existing Home Sales
Manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, Existing Home Sales Worse than Expected

27th of January, GDP + Durable Good Orders
GDP Significantly Worse than Expected, Durable Good Orders as Expected

1st of February, ADP Nonfarm Unemployment Change + U.S. Institute for Supply Management Manufacturing
Better than Expected (ISM Manufacturing at its highest level since November 2014)

3rd of February, Nonfarm Payrolls + Unemployment Rate
Nonfarm Payrolls better than Expected, Unemployment Rate Worse than Expected

14th of February, Producer Price Index (PPI)
Better than Expected

15th of February, Core CPI (Consumer Price Index) + Retail Sales
Better than Expected

16th of February, Building Permits + Initial Jobless Claims + Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index
Better than Expected

21st of February, Manufacturing PMI + Services PMI
Worse than Expected

27th of February, Core Durable Good Orders + Pending Home Sales
Worse than Expected

28th of February, GDP (Preliminary release)
Worse than Expected

3rd of March, ISM Non-manufacturing PMI + Fed Chair Yellen Speech
ISM Non-manufacturing PMI Better than Expected, Yellen noted that a rate increase at next meeting “would likely be appropriate” insisting on the condition that data on employment and inflation have to move in line with expectations.

Eyes on today release: ADP Nonfarm Employment Change